TAP Exams

TAP Exam FAQs

Who can take TAP exams?

Two groups of people: A) High school students who have taken high school courses that cover the same material as courses offered at Midlands Technical College and B) 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 students who wish to exempt a course from the exam list.

What does it cost?

Nothing! It is free.

What kind of credit is given?

Exemption credit. This type of credit may be used at 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 to fulfill course requirements but will not affect the GPA.

Do TAP exam credits transfer to other colleges?

No! TAP exam exemption credit is designed strictly for future and current 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 students. You should not use this method for earning credit if you are planning to transfer to a four-year institution or other college.

 

Are there other exams accepted at 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 that receive exemption credits?

Yes. AP, CLEP, and DSST are nationally recognized exams that are also awarded exemption credit. 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 is a testing site for CLEP and DSST exams.

How do I sign up for a TAP exam?

Please contact the Assessment Center at 803-738-7845 to schedule an appointment.

Do TAP exemption credits get added to my 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 record automatically?

No. Nothing gets added to your official record until you indicate that you want the credit. Email: tapexam@strangeracer.com or call the Student Academic Credentialing office at 790-7560. You don’t have to accept the credit. If you prefer, you can choose to ignore the exemption credit and take the course.

How can I use TAP Exam credit when I get to 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址?

Talk with your 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 advisor about how the credits you have earned can fit into your chosen program. Most TAP exams can be used for general elective credit even if they are not part of your specific program.

Can I take a TAP exam more than once?

No. Each TAP exam may only be taken once. If you fail the exam, and the course is part of your program, you will need to take the course for credit.

Do I have to apply to 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 before I take a TAP exam?

No. High school students who have not yet applied may take the exams.

What steps do I take if I already know that I want to attend 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址?

Apply to the college.

Are there restrictions on how old my TAP exemption credits can be in order to use them at 澳门真人赌博开户正规网址?

Not usually. Check with your advisor or department chair to find out if the credits will count toward graduation.

How do I get more information about TAP exams?

Email: tapexam@strangeracer.com or call 790-7560.

Exams

Business Information

ACC 111  Accounting Concepts
BUS 101  Introduction to Business
BUS 121  Business Law
CRJ 101  Introduction to Criminal Justice
MGT 101 Principles of Management
MKT 101  Marketing

Information Systems

CPT 115 COBOL Programming I
IST 225 Internet Communications
AOT 105 Keyboarding
AOT 110 Document Formatting

Engineering Technologies

Contact the Department Chair by email or call (803) 738-7787 for a list of available exams.

Health Sciences

AHS 102 Medical Terminology
AHS 119 Health Careers

Industrial Technologies

ACR 101 Fundamentals of Refrigeration
ACR 102 Tool and Services Techniques
ACR 106 Basic Electricity for HVAC/R
AUT 105 Beginning Engine Repair
AUT 106 Intermediate Engine Repair
AUT 112 Braking Systems
AUT 131 Electrical Systems
AUT 132 Automotive Electricity
AUT 133 Electrical Fundamentals
AUT 221 Suspension & Steering Diagnosis
AUT 222 Four Wheel Alignment
CGC 101 Intro. to Graphic Techniques
CGC 110 Electronic Publishing
CGC 122 Basic Offset Press Operations
CGC 125 Basic Offset Preparation
EEM 117 AC/DC Circuits I
EEM 118 AC/DC Circuits II
EEM 172 Electrical Print Reading
MTT 121 Machine Tool Theory I
MTT 122 Machine Tool Practice I

Business Information

ACC 111 – Accounting Concepts 3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of the principles of the basic accounting functions—collecting, recording, analyzing, and reporting information.

Exemption Competencies: The student should be able to perform the following:

  1. Describe the nature of a business and the role of accounting in business.
  2. Explain how business transactions can be stated in terms of the resulting changes in the basic elements of the accounting equation.
  3. Prepare the financial statements of a proprietorship and explain how they interrelate.
  4. List the rules of debit and credit and the normal balances of accounts.
  5. Analyze and summarize the financial statement effects of transactions.
  6. Prepare a trial balance.
  7. Summarize the adjustment process and prepare adjusting entries and an adjusted trial balance.
  8. Prepare a work sheet.
  9. Prepare closing entries.
  10. Review the seven basic steps of the accounting cycle.
  11. Define and give examples of the elements of internal control.
  12. Journalize and post transactions in a manual accounting system that uses subsidiary ledgers and special journals.
  13. Journalize the entries for merchandise transactions.
  14. Prepare an income statement for a merchandising business.
  15. Describe the nature of cash and basic procedures for achieving internal control over cash.
  16. Prepare a bank reconciliation and journalize any necessary entries.
  17. Account for small cash transactions using a petty cash fund.
  18. Journalize the entries for the allowance and direct methods of accounting for uncollectibles, and estimate uncollectible receivables based on sales and on an analysis of receivables.
  19. Journalize the entries for notes receivable transactions.

Exam Requirements: Students will take a comprehensive, chiefly multiple-choice examination which covers the Exemption Competencies listed above. As part of the examination, students will analyze and/or complete various financial statements. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pocket calculator

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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BUS 101 - Introduction to Business    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of the nature of business activity in relation to the economic society, including how a business is owned, organized, managed, and controlled.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be ale to perform the following:

  1. Recognize the distinguishing features of differing business systems.
  2. Recognize the degrees of business competition.
  3. Explain how a free market economy works.
  4. Discuss the ethical issues of business ownership.
  5. Differentiate varying forms of business enterprise.
  6. Explain the importance of small business in America.
  7. Explain the functions of management.
  8. Identify leadership styles and techniques.
  9. Identify a variety of organizational structures.
  10. Recall organizational concepts. >li>Outline the process that converts resources into products.
  11. Describe techniques for motivating people.
  12. List the steps in human resources management.
  13. Discuss the pros and cons of unions.
  14. Explain how companies market their products.
  15. Explain the marketing mix; product, price, distribution, and promotion.
  16. Define the information needs of a company and how to meet those needs through computing and accounting.
  17. List and discuss ways a business can raise and manage its financial resources.
  18. Discuss the role of the government in managing the nation's money supply.
  19. Discuss effective credit management.
  20. Explain financial management concepts.
  21. Demonstrate familiarity with securities markets.
  22. Select risk management techniques and insurance.
  23. Apply legal principles to the operation of a business.
  24. List ways government can help or hinder business.
  25. Apply the tax laws to business operations.
  26. Recognize the growing importance of international trade.

Exam Requirements: Students will take an objective written examination covering the Exemption Competencies described above. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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BUS 121 - Business Law I    3.0 Credits

Course Description: The course is a study of legal procedures, law and society, classifications and systems of law, the tribunals administering justice and their actions, contracts, sales transfer of titles, rights and duties of the parties, conditions, and warranties.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to:

  1. Explain the general meaning of the term law.
  2. Describe the origins and importance of the common law tradition.
  3. Identify the four major sources of American law.
  4. Identify the constitutional basis for the regulatory power of the federal government.
  5. Summarize the fundamental rights protected by the First Amendment.
  6. State the purpose of tort law.
  7. Identify some intentional torts against persons and property.
  8. Name the four elements of negligence.
  9. Define strict liability, and list some circumstances in which it will be applied.
  10. Summarize the laws protecting trademarks, patents, and copyrights.
  11. Explain the difference between criminal offences and other types of wrongful conduct.
  12. Indicate the essential elements of criminal liability.
  13. Describe the constitutional safeguards that protect the rights of persons accused of crimes.
  14. Identify and define the crimes that affect business.
  15. Summarize the defenses to criminal liability.
  16. Define the term contract, and list the basic elements that are required for contract formation.
  17. Identify the various types of contracts.
  18. State the requirements of an offer.
  19. Describe how an offer can be accepted.
  20. List and define the elements of consideration.
  21. Explain the contractual rights and obligations of minors.
  22. Indicate how intoxication affects contractual liability.
  23. Discuss why certain types of contracts and clauses are contrary to public policy.
  24. Describe fraudulent misrepresentation and its elements.
  25. Identify the types of contracts that must be in writing to be enforceable.
  26. Identify noncontracting parties who have rights under a contract.
  27. Discuss assignments of contract rights, and describe what rights can or cannot be assigned.
  28. Differentiate between complete and substantial performance of a contract, and indicate when a breach of contract occurs.
  29. Define the different types of damages that may be obtainable on the breach of a contract.
  30. List the equitable remedies that may be granted by courts, and indicate when they will be granted.
  31. Discuss the scope of the UCC’s Article 2 (on sales of goods) and Article 2A (on leases of goods).
  32. Indicate the ways in which the UCC changes the common law of contracts with respect to contract formation.
  33. Identify some rules that apply only to contracts between merchants.
  34. Define various contract terms that help to determine when the risk of loss passes from a seller or lessor to a buyer or lessee.
  35. Indicate when each party to a sale or lease contract has an insurable interest in the goods.
  36. Outline the performance obligations of sellers and lessors under the UCC.
  37. State the perfect tender rule, and identify and discuss its exceptions.
  38. Describe the performance obligations of buyers and lessees under the UCC.
  39. Point out the options available in the event that one of the parties to a sales or lease contract repudiates the contract prior to the time for performance.
  40. List and discuss the remedies available to the nonbreaching party when a sales or lease contract is breached.

Exam Requirements: Students will take a comprehensive test consisting of multiple choice questions and scenarios which require students to analyze information, apply knowledge of business, and respond in complete sentences to questions about the scenarios. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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CRJ 101-Introduction to Criminal Justice    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course includes an overview of the functions and responsibilities of agencies involved in the administration of justice to include police organizations, court systems, correctional systems, and juvenile justice.

Course Exit Competency: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Explain the history and development of Criminal Justice as an academic discipline.
  2. Describe Criminal Justice as a process and a system.
  3. Identify sources of law and explain the historical development of law in the United States.
  4. Identify classifications and elements of crime.
  5. Compare the major methods of collecting crime information.
  6. Describe the development of law enforcement.
  7. Identify the different levels of law enforcement.
  8. Explain the concept of police discretion and the factors that influence it.
  9. Discuss major issues currently facing police agencies.
  10. Describe the dual court system in the United States.
  11. Explain pre-trial and trial court procedures.
  12. Identify the goals of criminal punishment.
  13. Discuss the history and concept of probation.
  14. Explain the duties of probation officers.
  15. Identify intermediate sanctions.
  16. Identify the development of correctional institutions.
  17. Describe types of correctional institutions.
  18. Discuss the history and development of parole.
  19. Explain the parole process.
  20. Understand the differences between the adult and juvenile justice system.

Exam Requirements: Students will take a 50 question multiple-choice examination covering the Exemption Competencies listed above. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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MGT 101 - Principles of Management    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of management theories, emphasizing the management functions of planning, decision making, organizing, leading, and controlling.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to:

  1. Explain what a manager is and how the role of manager has changed.
  2. Describe the basic management functions and the management process.
  3. Explain the value of studying management history.
  4. Define organizational culture.
  5. Explain how culture constrains managers.
  6. Explain the difference between corporate social responsibility and economic performance.
  7. Outline the steps in the decision-making process.
  8. Define planning.
  9. Distinguish among the different types of plans.
  10. Define organizational structure and design.
  11. Describe the six key elements of organizational structure.
  12. Define communication.
  13. Tell how nonverbal communication affects managers.
  14. Explain the barriers to effective interpersonal communication.
  15. Explain the strategic importance of human resource management.
  16. Describe the selection devices that work best with different kinds of jobs.
  17. Explain the various approaches to performance appraisal.
  18. Define the focus and goals of organizational behavior.
  19. Describe the three components of an attitude.
  20. Explain how managers can shape employee behavior.
  21. Differentiate between formal and informal groups.
  22. Describe the five stages of group development.
  23. List the characteristics of effective teams.
  24. Define the motivation process.
  25. Identify ways to design motivating jobs.
  26. Explain the difference between managers and leaders.
  27. Explain gender and cultural differences in leaders.
  28. Define control.
  29. Describe the control process.
  30. Describe the qualities of an effective control process.
  31. Define value chain management.
  32. Discuss technology's role in operations management.

Exam Requirements: Students will take a multiple-choice examination that covers the Exemption Competencies described above. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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MKT 101 - Marketing    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is an introduction to the field of marketing with a detailed study of the marketing concept and the processes of product development, pricing, promotion, and marketing distribution.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Define marketing, need, want, demand, total quality management, a market, and marketing management.
  2. Describe the history of marketing to include the definition of barter and a monetary transaction.
  3. Define the marketing management philosophies: the production era/concept, the selling era/concept, the product era/concept, the marketing era/concept, and the relationship era/concept.
  4. Explain the steps in the planning process: developing a mission statement, setting goals/objectives.
  5. Define a strategic business unit.
  6. Define the major growth strategies: market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification.
  7. Define the marketing mix elements: product, price, promotion, and distribution/place.
  8. Define the components of the marketing environment: demographic environment, competitive environment, economic environment, natural environment, political environment, and technologic environment.
  9. Define the four basic forms of competition: pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly.
  10. Define marketing research.
  11. Define primary and secondary data and list advantages.
  12. Define marketing research methods: observation research, survey research, and experimental research.
  13. Define a sample.
  14. Define the major factors that affect consumer behavior: culture, social class, lifestyle, personality, perception, attitude, and learning.
  15. Explain Maslow’s theory of motivation. List the needs that are included in the hierarchy of needs.
  16. Define market segmentation. Define the market segmentation methods: geographic segmentation, demographic segmentation, and psychographic segmentation.
  17. Define a market segment.
  18. Define a target market.
  19. Define a product and a service.
  20. Define market/product positioning.
  21. Define the product classifications: convenience, shopping, and specialty products.
  22. Explain a generic brand.
  23. Define a brand. Define the branding options: private brand, manufacturer’s brand, licensing.
  24. Explain the test marketing stage of the new product development process.
  25. Define the stages in the product life cycle: introduction, growth, maturity, and decline.
  26. Define a style, a fashion, and a fad.
  27. Define pricing factors: fixed costs, variable costs, total costs.
  28. Define price elasticity of demand.
  29. Explain breakeven analysis.
  30. Define skimming pricing, penetration pricing, cost-plus pricing, uniformed delivered pricing and zone pricing
  31. Define the price adjustments: cash discount, quantity discount.
  32. Define direct distribution/marketing channels.
  33. Define the following distribution/marketing channel intermediaries: wholesaler, agent, broker, and retailer.
  34. Define the types of vertical marketing systems: corporate, administered, contractual, franchise.
  35. Define the market coverage approaches: intensive distribution, selective distribution, and exclusive distribution.
  36. Define the communications/promotion mix factors: advertising, personal selling, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing.
  37. Define an advertising agency.
  38. Define the different types of advertising: product advertising, institutional advertising, and cooperative advertising.
  39. Describe major advertising media.
  40. Describe major sales promotion tools.
  41. Describe major public relations tools.

Exam Requirements: Students will take a multiple-choice examination that covers the Exemption Competencies described above. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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Information Systems

CPT 115 - COBOL Programming I    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course introduces students to the nature and use of the common business-oriented language (COBOL).

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to design, code, test, debug, and document structured COBOL programs requiring the use of output editing, file access and generation, conditional processing, and arithmetic instructions.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the Information Systems Technology department. Only students who pass the written exam (a minimum score of 70%) will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam.

The first part is a written exam. Students will answer questions about how COBOL programs are designed, coded, executed, and documented. The practical part of the exam requires students to write executable COBOL code. It will be examined on Midlands Technical College computers. Students should be prepared to spend the entire day (5-7 hours) on the COBOL project. Students must score a minimum of 70% to pass.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 1 hour for the written and 5-7 hours for the coding project

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IST 225 Internet Communications    3.0 Credits

Please contact the Department Chair, Marian Nurse, by email or call (803) 738-7692 for a description and exam information.

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AOT 105 - Keyboarding    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course focuses on the mastery of keyboarding and basic formatting principles.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Operate by touch the letter, number, and symbol keys.
  2. Operate by touch the numeric keypad.
  3. Demonstrate proper keyboarding techniques.
  4. Use correct spacing and punctuation.
  5. Develop proofreading skills and correctly use proofreaders' marks.
  6. Use word processing commands necessary to complete the document processing activities.
  7. Format e-mail, reports, and letters.
  8. Type at least 20 net words per minute on 3-minute timed-writings.

Exam Requirements: Students must demonstrate keyboarding skills by keying basic business correspondence, such as a letter, a memo, and an announcement. They must also key at least 25 net words per minute on one of two timed-writing tasks administered during the testing period to pass.

Materials to bring: None.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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AOT 110 - Document Formatting 3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course emphasizes speed, accuracy, and development of document formatting skills using keyboard competencies.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Operate the keyboard by touch.
  2. Demonstrate proper keyboarding techniques.
  3. Develop proofreading skills and correctly use proofreaders' marks.
  4. Use word processing commands necessary to complete the document processing activities.
  5. Format business and academic reports from arranged and unarranged copy.
  6. Format business and personal letters and memos from arranged and unarranged material.
  7. Format envelopes and labels.
  8. Format open, boxed and ruled tables from rough draft material.
  9. Format employment documents to include traditional and electronic resumes, letters of application, and follow-up letters.
  10. Type three 3-minute timed-writings at 30 NWPM with no more than five errors.

Exam Requirements: Students must demonstrate their ability to key documents such as those mentioned above. They should be able to identify common proofreaders' marks. They must also key at least 30 net words per minute with no more than five errors on one of two 5-minute timed-writing tasks administered during the testing period.

Materials to bring: One formatted 3-½ inch high-density diskette.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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Engineering Technologies

Contact the Department Chair by email or call (803) 738-7787 for a list of available exams.

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Health Sciences

AHS 102 - Medical Terminology    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is designed to introduce the student to medical terms, including roots, prefixes, and suffixes, with emphasis on spelling, definition, and pronunciation.

Competencies: To successfully complete the 150 multiple choice questions on the Medical Terminology Exam with a 75% or higher, students should be able to:

  1. Define the meaning of medical terminology word roots, suffixes, and prefixes
  2. Recognize and understand basic medical terms
  3. Identify and decipher medical abbreviations
  4. Spell and pronounce basic medical terminology
  5. Analyze unfamiliar terms using the knowledge of word roots, suffixes and prefixes

Reference Books: Medical Terminology for Health Professions, 7ethEd by Ehrlich

Additional Textbooks/Readings: Tabor's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary, Davis or Steadman's Medical Dictionary, Lippincott

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

  • If the student has applied to the college, they must setup their My澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 account with user name and password prior to being able to access Desire to Learn (D2L).
  • If the student has not applied to the college they will be given a user name and password to be used for the exam only.
  • Prior to the test date, please read all information regarding the admission to the testing center so you know what to bring with you.

Exam Requirements: Students must pass with a minimum passing score of 75%. Exam is electronic, no materials will be allowed in the testing area.

Length of exam: 2 hours

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AHS 119 - Health Careers 3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course provides information on various health careers to include job responsibility and personal and educational requirements as well as an overview of the health care system and its unique nomenclature and delivery of care.

Competencies: To successfully complete the 100 multiple choice questions on the Health Careers Exam with a 75% or higher, students should be able to:

  • Professionalism and continuing education and why they are important in Health Care.
  • Ethics, personal traits and professional image, teamwork and diversity in Health Care.
  • Interpersonal, electronic and HIT as they relate to communication in Health Care.
  • Finding the right health occupation for you.
  • Health, wellness and safety as it relates to your patients, coworkers and yourself.
  • Leadership and professional development in Health Care.

Reference Books: Becoming a Health Care Professional, Makely, Badasch and Chesebro

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

  • If the student has applied to the college, they must setup their My澳门真人赌博开户正规网址 account with user name and password prior to being able to access Desire to Learn (D2L).
  • If the student has not applied to the college they will be given a user name and password to be used for the exam only.
  • Prior to the test date, please read all information regarding the admission to the testing center so you know what to bring with you.

Exam Requirements: Students must pass with a minimum passing score of 75%. Exam is electronic, no materials will be allowed in the testing area.

Length of exam: 2 hours

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Industrial Technologies

ACR 101 - FUNDAMENTALS OF REFRIGERATION    5.0 CREDITS

Course Description: This course covers the refrigeration cycle, refrigerants, pressure temperature relationships, and system components. The students will learn the scientific principles of refrigeration.

Note: ACR 101 – Fundamentals of Refrigeration and ACR 102 – Tools and Service Techniques and ACR 106 – Basic Electricity for HVAC/R are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

Explain the difference between sensible heat, specific heat, and latent heat and describe their applications.

  1. Explain the physical laws (Charles', Boyle's, and Dalton's) which apply to refrigeration.
  2. Explain the difference between absolute and gauge pressures.
  3. Identify various compressors, condensers, refrigerant controls and evaporators and explain the function of each.
  4. Draw a schematic of a refrigeration system with a minimum of twelve components.
  5. Explain the compression cycle of refrigeration.
  6. Use temperature conversion formulas to convert from one temperature scale to another.
  7. Mark and remove compressor parts, identify parts, explain how parts are lubricated, explain the function of each part and lay out in proper order for accurate reassembly.
  8. Identify specific refrigerants by color code, chemical name, and/or chemical formula in order to choose the proper refrigerant to use in a specific system.
  9. Read a pressure/temperature chart to determine the proper pressure for a refrigerant at a given temperature.
  10. Demonstrate appropriate safety techniques.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam.

The written exam consists of definitions of basic refrigeration terms and identification of concepts described in the exemption competencies. The practical applications exam is described above in Exemption Competency # 8. Students must pass a safety test prior to working on any equipment or using any tools. Any unsafe act will result in immediate termination of the practical applications exam and will result in failure to exempt the course. Students must pass both the written and the practical applications exams with minimum scores of 70 in order to receive exemption credit

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 2 hours for the practicals

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ACR 102 - Tools and Service Techniques    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a basic study of the uses of tools and service equipment used in the installation and repair of HVAC equipment.

Note: ACR 101 – Fundamentals of Refrigeration and ACR 102 – Tools and Service Techniques and ACR 106 – Basic Electricity for HVAC/R are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Select appropriate tools for specific refrigeration tasks.
  2. Measure cut, ream, file, and use of flaring tool to flare copper tubing.
  3. Measure cut, ream, file, and use a swaging tool to swage copper tubing to prepare for soldering.
  4. Identify and use the proper fittings to connect copper tubing.
  5. Use appropriate safety procedures to assemble and use air-acetylene torch to solder and braze.
  6. Select and use proper soldering and brazing materials to correctly assembly copper-to-copper and copper-to-steel joints.
  7. Explain the operation of service valves on a system.
  8. Properly and safely install a gauge manifold on a system.
  9. Read operating pressures and determine the condensing and evaporating temperatures to check proper operation of equipment.
  10. Determine when to measure volts, amps, ohms, watts, and microfarads.
  11. Select appropriate meters for a specific electrical task.
  12. Use appropriate safety procedures to assemble and use oxy-acetylene torch to gas weld and cut.
  13. Demonstrate proper use of a vacuum pump by correctly attaching it to a system with a gauge manifold to remove all unwanted air, moisture and gases in the system.
  14. Using a changing cylinder, measure the appropriate amount of refrigerant and charge the system.
  15. Use the appropriate leak detectors to find a refrigerant leak.
  16. Demonstrate the use of the refrigerant recovery system.

Exam Requirements: Only students who have passed the written exam for ACR-101 will be allowed to take ACR-102! The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students will be required to perform multiple tasks in a lab setting to demonstrate they can identify, explain the function of, and properly and safely use the tools, equipment, and materials described in the exemption competencies. Students must pass a safety test prior to working on any equipment or using any tools. Any unsafe act will result in immediate termination of the practical applications exam and will result in failure to exempt the course. Students must receive a minimum score of 70 on the practical applications exam in order to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 2 hours for the practicals

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ACR 106 - Basic Electricity for HVAC    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course includes a basic study of electricity, including OHM's Law and series and parallel circuits as they relate to heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and/or refrigeration.

Note: ACR 101 – Fundamentals of Refrigeration and ACR 102 – Tools and Service Techniques and ACR 106 – Basic Electricity for HVAC/R are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Describe and explain the characteristics of voltage, current, resistance, and power in a series circuit.
  2. Use Ohm's Law to calculate unknown components and/or circuit quantities in a given series circuit.
  3. Describe and explain the characteristics of voltage, current, resistance, and power in a parallel circuit.
  4. Calculate unknown components and/or circuit quantities in a simple parallel circuit.
  5. Build a simple series/parallel circuit.
  6. Using the length, diameter, type of material, and temperature, determine appropriate wire sizes for specific applications.
  7. Identify and describe the operating characteristics of the six motors used in ACR equipment.
  8. Disassemble various motors; identify and test components; reassemble motors.
  9. Explain the characteristics and purpose of start and run capacitors and how to test them.
  10. Identify various symbols used in electric circuits.
  11. Use proper techniques and procedures to troubleshoot a live circuit.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam! The department chair or program director will contact eligible students to schedule a day & time for the practical exam.

The written exam focuses on basic concepts of electricity. The practical exam requires students to build series and/or parallel circuits and troubleshoot live circuits. Students must achieve minimum scores of 76 on both the written and the practical applications exams in order to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 2 hours for the practicals

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AUT 105 - Beginning Engine Repair    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a basic study of minor engine repairs, including in-frame repairs and cylinder head reconditioning.

Note: AUT 105 - Beginning Engine Repair and AUT 106 - Intermediate Engine Repair are closely related courses. Students must exempt both courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 105
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

General engine diagnosis; removal and reinstallation (R & R)    

  1. Interpret complaint and/or road test vehicle, determine needed repairs:
  2. Inspect engine assembly for fuel, oil, coolant, and other leaks; determine needed repairs.
  3. Listen to engine noises; determine needed repairs.
  4. Diagnose the cause of excessive oil consumption, unusual engine exhaust color, odor, and sound; determine needed repairs.
  5. Perform engine vacuum tests; determine needed repairs.
  6. Perform cylinder power balance tests; determine needed repairs.
  7. Perform cylinder compression tests; determine needed repairs.
  8. Perform cylinder leakage tests; determine needed repairs.
  9. Remove engine (front wheel drive); prepare for tear down.
  10. Reinstall engine (from wheel drive).
  11. Remove engine (rear wheel drive); prepare for tear down.
  12. Reinstall engine (rear wheel drive).

Cylinder Head and valve train diagnosis and repair

  1. Remove cylinder heads; visually inspect cylinder heads for cracks; gasket surface areas for warpage and leakage; check passage condition.
  2. Install cylinder heads and gaskets.
  3. Inspect and test valve springs for squareness, pressure, and free height comparison; replace as necessary.
  4. Inspect valve spring retainers, locks, and valve lock grooves.
  5. Inspect valve guides for wear, check valve guide height and stem-to-guide clearance; recondition/replace as necessary.
  6. Inspect valve seats; resurface or replace.
  7. Check valve face-to-seat contact and valve seat concentricity (runout); service seats and valves as necessary.
  8. Check valve spring assembled height and valve stem height; service valve and spring assemblies as necessary.
  9. Inspect pushrods, rocker arms, rocker arm pivots, and shafts for wear, bending, cracks, looseness, and blocked oil passages; repair or replace.
  10. Inspect, test, and replace hydraulic or mechanical lifers.
  11. Inspect and replace camshaft drives. (includes checking gear wear and backlash, sprocket and chain wear, overhead cam drive sprockets, drive belts, belt tension, and tensioners).
  12. Inspect and measure camshaft journals and lobes.
  13. Inspect and measure camshaft bearing surfaces for damage, out-of-round, and alignments; determine needed repairs.
  14. Measure camshaft timing.

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AUT 106 - Intermediate Engine Repair    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course includes an application of the fundamentals of engine diagnosis and repair, including engine removal and installation procedures.

Note: AUT 105 - Beginning Engine Repair and AUT 106 - Intermediate Engine Repair are closely related courses. Students must exempt both courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 106
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

Engine block diagnosis and repair    

  1. Inspect and replace pans, covers, gaskets, and seals.
  2. Visually inspect engine block for cracks, passage condition, core and gallery plug condition, and surface warpage; service block or determine needed repairs.
  3. Inspect and repair damaged threads.
  4. Remove cylinder wall ridges. Inspect and measure cylinder walls for damage and wear; determine needed repairs.
  5. Hone and clean cylinder walls.
  6. Inspect and measure camshaft bearings for wear, damage, out-of-round, and alignment; determine needed repairs.
  7. Inspect crankshaft for surface cracks and journal damage; check oil passage condition; measure journal wear; service crankshaft or determine needed repair.
  8. Inspect and measure main and connecting rod bearings for damage, clearance, and end play; determine needed repairs (includes the proper selection of bearings).
  9. Identify piston and bearing wear patterns that indicate connecting rod alignment and main bearing bore problems; inspect rod alignment and bearing bore condition.
  10. Inspect, measure, service, or replace pistons.
  11. Install new piston pins and bushings (as applicable).
  12. Inspect, measure, and install piston rings.
  13. Inspect, repair or replace crankshaft vibration damper (harmonic balancer).
  14. Inspect crankshaft flange and flywheel/flexplate for burrs; repair as necessary.
  15. Inspect flywheel/flexplate for cracks, wear (Includes ring gear), and measure runout; determine needed repairs.
  16. Inspect, remove and replace crankshaft pilot bearing/bushing (as applicable).
  17. Reassemble engine parts using correct gaskets and sealants.
  18. Inspect auxiliary (balance, intermediate, idler, counterbalance, or silencer) shaft(s); Inspect shafts and support bearings for damage and wear; determine needed repairs; reinstall and time.
  19. Prime engine lubrication system.

Lubrication and cooling systems diagnosis and repair

  1. Perform oil pressure tests; determine needed repairs.
  2. Inspect, measure, repair, or replace oil pumps (includes gears, rotors, and housing), pressure relief devices, and pump drives.
  3. Perform cooling system tests (pressure, combustion leakage, and temperature); determine needed repairs.
  4. Inspect, replace, and adjust drive belts and pulleys.
  5. Inspect and replace engine cooling and heater system hoses.
  6. Inspect, test and replace thermostat, by-pass, and housing.
  7. Inspect coolant; drain, flush, refill, and bleed cooling system with recommended coolant.
  8. Inspect, test, and replace water pump.
  9. Inspect, test, and replace radiator, pressure cap, and coolant recovery system.
  10. Clean, inspect, test, and replace fan(s) electrical and mechanical), fan clutch, fan shroud, and cooling system related temperature sensors/switches.
  11. Inspect, test, repair or replace auxiliary oil coolers.
  12. Inspect, test and replace oil temperature/pressure switches and sensors.
  13. Perform oil change. (Note: Special diesel/turbo charged engine procedures must be followed).

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AUT 112 - Braking Systems    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course covers hydro-boost power brakes and vacuum power brakes as well as master cylinders and calipers rebuilding.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 112
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

Hydraulic system diagnosis and repair

  1. Replace brake lines (double flare and ISO types), hoses, fittings, and supports.
  2. Select, handle, store and install brake fluids (includes silicone fluids).
  3. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling, or dragging caused by problems in the hydraulic system valve(s).
  4. Inspect, test, and replace metering (hold-off), proportioning (balance), pressure differential, and combination valves.
  5. Inspect, test, replace, and adjust load or height sensing-type proportioning valve(s).
  6. Inspect, test, and replace brake warning light system switch and wiring.
  7. Reset brake pressure differential valve.
  8. Bleed (manual, pressure, vacuum, or surge) and/or flush hydraulic system.
  9. Check and adjust master cylinder fluid levels.

Drum brake diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling, or dragging caused by problems in the drum brake wheel assembly; determine needed repairs.
  2. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing dragging or pedal pulsation caused by problems in the drum brake mechanical assembly; determine needed repairs.
  3. Remove, clean (using proper safety procedures), inspect, and measure brake drums.
  4. Mount brake drum on lathe and machine braking surface.
  5. Remove, clean, and inspect brake shoes/linings, springs, pins, clips levers, adjusters; self-adjusters, and other related brake hardware; determine needed repairs.
  6. Clean and remove loose dirt; rust, or scale on braking backing (support) plates (using proper safety procedures); inspect; remove and reinstall if necessary.
  7. Remove and reinstall/replace wheel cylinders.
  8. Disassemble and clean wheel cylinder assembly; inspect parts for wear, rust, scoring, and damage; hone cylinder (if necessary and recommended by manufacturer); replace all cups, boots, and any damaged or worn parts.
  9. Lubricate brake shoe support pads on backing (support) plate, adjuster/self adjuster mechanisms, and other brake hardware.
  10. Determine correct brake shoe application.
  11. Install brake shoes and related hardware.
  12. Adjust brake shoes and reinstall brake drums or drum/hub assemblies and wheel bearings.
  13. Reinstall wheel, torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments.

Disc brake diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose poor stopping, pulling, or dragging caused by problems, in the disc brake caliper assembly; determine needed repairs.
  2. Diagnose poor stopping, noise, pulling, grabbing, dragging, or pedal pulsation caused by problems in the disc brake mechanical assembly; determine needed repairs.
  3. Remove caliper assembly from mountings; clean and inspect for leaks and damage to caliper housing.
  4. Clean and inspect caliper mountings and slides for wear and damage.
  5. Remove, clean, and inspect pads and retaining hardware; determine needed repairs, adjustments, and replacements.
  6. Remove, disassemble, and clean caliper assembly; inspect parts for wear, rust, scoring, and damage; replace all seals, boots, and any damaged or worn parts.
  7. Reassembly and reinstall caliper.
  8. Clean and inspect rotor; measure rotor with a dial indicator and a micrometer.
  9. Remove rotor, mount on lathe, and machine (apply non-directional finish where applicable).
  10. Determine correct brake pad application.
  11. Install pads, calipers, and related attaching hardware.
  12. Adjust caliper with integrated parking brakes.
  13. Fill master cylinder with recommended fluid and seat pads; inspect caliper for leaks.
  14. Reinstall wheel and torque lug nuts, and make final checks and adjustments.
  15. Test pedal free travel with and without engine running; check power booster operation.

Power assist units diagnosis and repair

  1. Test pedal free travel with and without engine running; check power booster operation.
  2. Check vacuum supply (manifold or auxiliary pump) to vacuum-type power booster with a vacuum gauge.
  3. Inspect the vacuum-type power booster unit for vacuum leaks; inspect the check valve for proper operation; repair or replace parts as necessary.
  4. Inspect and test hydro-boost system and accumulator for leaks and proper operation; repair and replace parts as necessary.

Miscellaneous (wheel bearings, parking brakes, electrical, etc.) diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose wheel bearing noises, wheel shimmy and vibration problems; determine needed repairs.
  2. Remove, clean, inspect, repack, or replace and pack wheel bearings, replace seals and adjust wheel bearings.
  3. Check parking brake system; inspect cables and parts for wear, rusting, binding and corrosion; clean or replace parts as necessary; lubricate assembly.
  4. Adjust parking brake assembly; check operation.
  5. Test parking brake indicator lights, switches, and wiring.
  6. Test, adjust, repair or replace brake stop light switch and wiring.

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AUT 131 - Electrical Systems    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of the individual systems and components that, when combined, form the entire automobile electrical system. This course includes starting and charging systems, ignition, engine, chassis, and accessory systems, as well as instruction in the proper use of electrical schematics.

Note: AUT 131 - Electrical Systems, AUT 132 - Automotive Electricity, and AUT 133 - Electrical Fundamentals are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 131
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

Battery diagnosis and service

  1. Perform battery state-of-charge test; determine needed service.
  2. Perform battery capacity (load, high-rate discharge) test; determine needed service.
  3. Perform battery 3 minute charge test; determine needed service.
  4. Inspect, clean, and fill battery.
  5. Replace and reinstall battery.
  6. Perform slow/fast battery charge.
  7. Inspect, clean, and repair or replace battery cables, connectors, and clamps.
  8. Jump start a vehicle using jumper cables and a booster battery or auxiliary power supply.

Starting system diagnosis and repair

  1. Perform starter current draw test; determine needed repairs.
  2. Perform starter circuit voltage drop tests; determine needed repairs.
  3. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches, connectors, and wires of starter control circuits.
  4. Inspect, test, and replace starter relays and solenoids.
  5. Remove and replace/reinstall starter.
  6. Disassemble, clean, inspect, test, and replace starter components; perform bench test.

Charging system diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose charging system problems that cause an undercharge, a non-charge, or an overcharge condition.
  2. Inspect, adjust, and replace alternator drive belts, pulleys, and fans.
  3. Perform charging system output test; determine needed repairs.
  4. Remove and replace regulator.
  5. Perform charging circuit voltage drop tests; determine needed repairs.
  6. Inspect and repair or replace connectors and wires of charging circuits.
  7. Perform alternator oscilloscope pattern tests; determine needed repairs.
  8. Remove and replace/reinstall alternator.
  9. Disassemble, clean, inspect, and replace alternator components.

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AUT 132 - Automotive Electricity    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of electricity as used in automotive applications. This course includes DC and AC principles and their various uses in the automobile. The relationship between Ohm's Law and actual automotive circuits is demonstrated.

Note: AUT 131 - Electrical Systems, AUT 132 - Automotive Electricity, and AUT 133 - Electrical Fundamentals are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 132
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

Horn and wiper/washer diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose the cause of constant, intermittent, or no horn(s) operation.
  2. Test, and repair or replace horn(s), horn relay, horn button (switch), connectors, and wires of horn circuits.
  3. Diagnose the cause of constant, intermittent, or no wiper operation; diagnose the cause of wiper speed control and park problems.
  4. Replace delay (pulsing) wiper speed controls.
  5. Replace wiper motor, wiper motor resistor, and park switch or relay.
  6. Repair or replace switches, connectors, and wires of wiper circuits.
  7. Diagnose the cause of constant, intermittent, or no windshield washer operation.
  8. Replace washer.
  9. Repair or replace switches, connectors, and wires of washer circuits.

Body

  1. Diagnose the cause of slow, intermittent, or no operation of power-driven window(s) and/or sunroof.
  2. Adjust, repair, or replace power-driven window(s) and/or sunroof regulators (linkages).
  3. Repair or replace switches, relays, motors, connectors, and wires of power-driven window(s) and/or sunroof circuits.
  4. Diagnose the cause of slow, intermittent, or no power seat operation.
  5. Repair or replace switches, relays, solenoids, motors, connectors, and wires of power seat circuits.
  6. Adjust or replace power seat gear box, cables, and slave units.
  7. Diagnose the cause of poor, intermittent, or no rear window defogger operation.
  8. Repair or replace switches, relays, window grid, blower motors, connectors, and wires of rear window defogger circuits.
  9. Diagnose the cause of poor, intermittent, or no electric door and hatch/trunk lock operation.
  10. Repair or replace switches, relays, actuators, connectors, and wires of electric door and hatch/trunk lock circuits.
  11. Diagnose the cause of poor intermittent, or no keyless lock/unlock device operation.
  12. Repair or replace components, connectors, and wires of keyless lock/unlock device circuits.
  13. Diagnose the cause of slow, intermittent, or no operation of electrically-operated convertible tops.
  14. Repair or replace motors, switches, relays connectors, and wires of electrically-operated convertible top circuits.
  15. Diagnose the cause of poor, intermittent, or no operation of electrically-operated and electrically-heated components (mirrors, seats, windshields, etc.)
  16. Repair or replace motors, heating units, switches, relays, connectors, and wires of electrically-operated and electrically heated component circuits.

Miscellaneous

  1. Diagnose the cause of radio static and weak, intermittent, or no radio reception.
  2. Repair or replace grounds, connectors, and wires of sound system circuits.
  3. Inspect, test, and replace speakers.
  4. Inspect, test, and replace radio antenna and lead.
  5. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches, motor, connectors, and wires of power antenna circuits.
  6. Replace noise suppression components.
  7. Trim (adjust) radio antenna.
  8. Inspect, test, and repair or replace case, integral fuse, connectors, and wires of cigar lighter circuits.
  9. Inspect, test, and repair or replace clock, connectors, and wires of clock circuits.
  10. Diagnose the cause of unregulated, intermittent, or no operation of cruise control systems.
  11. Repair or replace switches, relays, electronic control units, speed signal generators, connectors, and wires of cruise control circuits.
  12. Adjust, and repair or replace cruise control speedometer cables, regulator, servo, and hoses.
  13. Diagnose the cause of poor, intermittent, or no anti-theft system operation.
  14. Repair or replace components, switches, relays connectors, and wire of anti-theft system circuits.
  15. Diagnose the cause(s) of the airbag warning light staying on or flashing; (Note: Follow manufacturers' safety procedures to prevent accidental deployment).
  16. Inspect, test, repair, or replace the airbag, airbag module, sensors, connectors, and wires of the airbag system circuit(s); (Note: Follow manufacturers' safety procedures to prevent accidental deployment).

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AUT 133 - Electrical Fundamentals    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of the theories of electricity, including magnetism, Ohm's Law, and the introduction to the use of various electrical test equipment.

Note: AUT 131 - Electrical Systems, AUT 132 - Automotive Electricity, and AUT 133 - Electrical Fundamentals are co-requisites; therefore, students must exempt all three courses in order to receive credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 133
AUTOMOTIVE TASK LIST

General electrical system diagnosis

  1. Use wiring diagrams to determine needed electrical circuit repairs.
  2. Check continuity in electrical circuits using a test light; determine needed repairs.
  3. Check applied voltages and voltage drops in electrical circuits using analog and digital voltmeters; determine needed repairs.
  4. Check applied voltages in electrical circuits using an oscilloscope; determine needed repairs.
  5. Check current flow in electrical circuits and components using an ammeter; determine needed repairs.
  6. Check continuity and resistances in electrical circuits and components using analog and digital ohmmeters; determine needed repairs.
  7. Check electrical circuits using jumper wires; determine needed repairs.
  8. Find shorts, grounds, opens, and high resistance problems in electrical circuits; determine needed repairs.
  9. Diagnose the cause(s) of abnormal battery drain; determine needed repairs.
  10. Inspect, test, and replace fusible links, circuit breakers, and fuses.

Headlights, parking lights, taillights, dash lights and courtesy lights

  1. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no headlight operation.
  2. Inspect, replace, and aim headlights/bulbs.
  3. Inspect, test, and repair or replace headlight and dimmer switches, relays, sockets, connectors, and wires of headlight circuits.
  4. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, slow, or no retractable headlight assembly operation.
  5. Inspect, test, and repair or replace motors, switches, relays, connectors, and wires of retractable headlight assembly circuits.
  6. Diagnose the cause of brighter than normal, intermittent, dim, or no parking light and/or taillight operation.
  7. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches, relays, bulbs, sockets, connectors, and wires of parking light and taillight circuit.
  8. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, dim no lights, or no brightness control of dash light circuits.
  9. Inspect, test and repair or replace switches, relays, bulbs, sockets, connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of dash light circuits.
  10. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, dim, or no courtesy light operation.
  11. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches, relays bulbs, sockets, connectors, and wires of courtesy light circuits.

Stop light, turn signals, hazard lights, and back-up lights

  1. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, dim, or no stoplight operation.
  2. Inspect, test, and adjust or replace stoplight switch.
  3. Inspect, test, and repair or replace bulbs, sockets, connectors, and wires of stoplight circuits.
  4. Diagnose the cause of no turn signal and hazard lights or lights with no flash on one or both sides.
  5. Inspect, test, and replace turn signal and hazard light switches and flasher units.
  6. Inspect, test, and repair or replace bulbs, sockets, connectors, and wires of turn signal and hazard light circuits.
  7. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, dim, or no back-up light operation.
  8. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches, bulbs, sockets, connectors, and wires of back-up light circuits.

Gauges, warning devices, and driver information systems diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose the cause of intermittent, high, low, or no gauge readings. (Note: Diagnosing causes of abnormal charging system gauge readings is limited to dash units and their electrical connections; other causes of abnormal charging system gauge readings are covered in CHARGING SYSTEM DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR.)
  2. Test and replace gauge circuit voltage regulators (limiters).
  3. Inspect, test, and replace gauges and gauge sending units.
  4. Inspect, test, and repair or replace connectors, wires, and printed circuit boards of gauge circuits.
  5. Diagnose the cause of constant, intermittent, or no warning light/driver information system operation. (Note: Diagnosing causes of abnormal charging system warning light operation is limited to dash units and their electrical connections; other causes of abnormal charging system warning light operation are covered in CHARGING SYSTEM DIAGNOSIS AND REPAIR.)
  6. Inspect, test, and repair or replace bulbs, sockets, connectors, wires, and electronic components of warning light/driver information system circuits.
  7. Diagnose the cause of constant, intermittent, or no operation of audible warning devices.
  8. Inspect, test, and repair or replace switches relays, timers, electronic components, printed circuits, connectors, and wires of audible warning device circuits.
  9. Diagnose the cause(s) of intermittent, high, low, or no readings on electronic digital instrument clusters.
  10. Inspect, test, repair or replace sensors, sending units, connectors, and wires of electronic digital instrument circuits.

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AUT 221 - Suspension and Steering    3.0 Credits
AUT 222 - Four Wheel Alignment    2.0 Credits

Course Descriptions: AUT 221 - Suspension and Steering - is a basic study of suspension and steering systems in automobiles. AUT 222 - Four Wheel Alignment - is a review of alignment angles and adjusting procedures used in four-wheel alignment, including the use of four-wheel alignment equipment.

Note: These courses are co-requisites: therefore, students must exempt both courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. Students must pass a written examination and perform tasks selected from the task list of exemption competencies. Students must achieve minimum scores of 80 on both the written and the performance exams to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

  • Students are required to bring OSHA approved safety glasses and wear appropriate work attire for the automotive environment. Shorts, cut-offs, T-shirts and/or open shoes are not allowed as they do not provide sufficient protection in the lab. Any students not meeting these requirements will not be allowed to take the exam. All tools required for the exam will be provided.

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours for the written and 5 hours for the practical

AUT 221 Automotive Task List

Steering systems diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose steering column noises, looseness, and binding problems (including tilt mechanisms); determine needed repairs.
  2. Diagnose power steering gear (non-rack and pinion type) binding, uneven turning effort, looseness, hard steering, and fluid leakage problems; determine needed repairs.
  3. Diagnose manual steering gear (non-rack and pinion type) binding, uneven turning efforts, looseness, hard steering, and fluid leakage problems; determine needed repairs.
  4. Diagnose power rack and pinion steering gear vibration, looseness, and hard steering problems; determine needed repairs.
  5. Diagnose manual rack and pinion steering gear vibration, looseness and hard steering problems; determine needed repairs.
  6. Inspect and replace steering shaft Universal-joint(s), flexible coupling(s), collapsible columns, and steering wheel.
  7. Remove and replace manual/power steering gear (non-rack and pinion type).
  8. Disassemble, inspect, repair and reassembly manual steering gear (non-rack and pinion type).
  9. Adjust manual/power steering gear (non-rack and pinion type) worm bearing preload and sector lash.
  10. Remove and replace manual/power rack and pinion steering gear.
  11. Disassemble, inspect, repair and reassembly rack and pinion steering gear.
  12. Adjust manual/power rack and pinion steering gear.
  13. Inspect and replace manual/power rack and pinion steering gear inner tie rod ends (sockets) and bellows boots.
  14. Inspect and replace rack pinion steering gear mounting bushings and brackets.
  15. Inspect manual and power steering fluid levels and condition.
  16. Flush power steering system.
  17. Diagnose power steering fluid leakage; determine needed repairs.
  18. Inspect, adjust, and replace power steering pump belt(s).
  19. Remove and replace power steering pump; inspect pump mounts.
  20. Inspect and replace power steering pump seals and gaskets.
  21. Inspect and replace power steering pump pulley.
  22. Perform power steering system pressure test; determine needed repairs.
  23. Inspect and replace power steering hoses and fittings.
  24. Inspect and replace power steering gear (non-rack and pinion type) seals and gaskets.
  25. Inspect and replace pitman arm.
  26. Inspect and replace relay (center link/intermediate) rod.
  27. Inspect and replace idler arm and mountings.
  28. Inspect, replace, and adjust tie rod (sockets), tie rod sleeves, clamps, and tie rod ends.
  29. Inspect and replace steering linkage damper.

Front suspensions

  1. Diagnose short and long arm-type suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven riding height problems; determine needed repairs.
  2. Diagnose MacPherson strut suspension system noises, body sway, and uneven riding height problems; determine needed repairs.
  3. Inspect and replace upper and lower control arms.
  4. Inspect and replace upper and lower control arms bushings, shafts, and rebound bumpers.
  5. Inspect, adjust, and replace strut (compression/tension) rods and bushings.
  6. Inspect and replace upper and lower ball joints on short and long arm-type suspension systems.
  7. Inspect and replace steering knuckle assemblies.
  8. Inspect and replace short and long arm type front suspension system coil springs and spring insulators.
  9. Inspect and replace stabilizer bar bushings, brackets, and links.
  10. Inspect and replace ball joints on MacPherson strut suspension systems.
  11. Inspect and replace MacPherson strut cartridge or assembly.
  12. Inspect and replace front MacPherson strut coil spring and insulators.
  13. Lubricate suspension/steering systems.

Rear suspensions

  1. Inspect and replace rear suspension system coil springs and spring insulators.
  2. Inspect and replace rear suspension system transverse links, control arms, bushings, and mounts.
  3. Inspect and replace rear suspension system leaf springs, leaf spring insulators (silencers), shackles, brackets, bushings, and mounts.
  4. Inspect and replace rear MacPherson strut cartridge or assembly.
  5. Inspect and replace read MacPherson strut coil spring and insulators.

Miscellaneous service

  1. Inspect and replace shock absorbers.
  2. Inspect and service/replace front and/or rear wheel bearings.
  3. Diagnose, inspect, adjust, repair or replace components of electronically-controlled suspension systems.

Wheel and tire diagnosis and repair

Balance wheel and tire assembly (static or dynamic).
Dismount, inspect and remount tire on wheel.
Reinstall wheel; torque lug nuts.

AUT 222
Automotive Task List

Front suspensions

  1. Inspect, replace, and adjust front suspension system torsion bars; inspect mounts.

Rear suspensions

  1. Inspect rear wheel drive axle assembly for bending, warpage, and misalignment.

Wheel alignment diagnosis, adjustment, and repair

  1. Diagnose vehicle wandering, pulling, hard steering, and poor steering return problems; determine needed repairs.
  2. Measure vehicle riding height; determine needed repairs.
  3. Check and adjust front and rear wheel camber on suspension systems with a camber adjustment.
  4. Check front and rear wheel camber on non-adjustable suspension systems; determine needed repairs.
  5. Check and adjust caster on suspension systems with a caster adjustment.
  6. Check caster on non-adjustable suspension systems; determine needed repairs.
  7. Check and adjust front wheel toe.
  8. Center steering wheel.
  9. Check toe-out-on-turns (turning radius); determine needed repairs.
  10. Check SAI (steering axis inclination)/KPI (king pin inclination)/included angle; determine needed repairs.
  11. Check and adjust (where applicable) rear wheel toe.
  12. Check rear wheel thrust angle; determine needed repairs.
  13. Check for front wheel setback; determine needed repairs.

Wheel and tire diagnosis and repair

  1. Diagnose unusual tire wear patterns; determine needed repairs.
  2. Inspect tires, check and adjust air pressure.
  3. Diagnose wheel/tire vibration, shimmy, and tramp problems; determine needed repairs.
  4. Rotate tires according to manufacturer's recommendations.
  5. Measure wheel, tire, axle, and hub runout; determine needed repairs.
  6. Diagnose tire pull (lead) problems; determine corrective actions

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CGC 101-Introduction to Graphic Techniques 3. 0 Credits

Course Description: This course covers the processes of printed reproduction with an emphasis on offset printing. A variety of printing equipment and operating techniques are included.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Demonstrate safe operation of tools and equipment.
  2. Set up 81/2" x 11" sheet press run on duplicator.
  3. Adjust ink and water balance on duplicator for average quality work.
  4. Properly clean duplicator after printing a job.
  5. Read a ruler to the accuracy of 1/16".
  6. Use a proportion wheel for calculating enlargements and reductions.
  7. Make a line negative.
  8. Strip a two-color job with tight registration using accepted techniques.
  9. Produce offset plates for one-and-two color work.
  10. Demonstrate creativity.
  11. Visualize format of finished product.

Exam Requirements: The exam is made up of three parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. The third requirement, a portfolio, is done prior to the practical exam. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam! The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam tests the student's ability to define basic terms and explain printing processes. Students must complete an assignment on lab safety prior to being given access to any tools or equipment. For the hands-on exam, students must complete a two-color tight register job of a project. Students must submit a portfolio containing examples of a single color screen printed project. A signed statement from their high school teacher stating that they have performed the work must be submitted the day of the exam. Students must achieve an overall minimum score of 70 to receive exemption credit. The written exam will count as 30% and the hands-on project and portfolio will count as 70% of the total score.

Approximate length of exam: 1.5 hours for the written and two 5 hours sessions for the practical

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CGC 110 - Electronic Publishing    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This is an introductory course to the fundamentals of electronic publishing. The student will become familiar with the Macintosh computer, learn basic typesetting/computer terms, and develop a working knowledge of QuarkXPress. Ethics in the workplace will be covered.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Identify the common parts of a character or letter.
  2. Describe the difference between family, series, and font of type.
  3. Perform copy fitting procedures.
  4. Use computers for desktop publishing functions to produce a variety of documents.
  5. Perform basic "housekeeping" on your computer.
  6. Accurately measure type size and line lengths in picas and points.
  7. Use proofreading marks correctly.
  8. Identify the uses of computer hardware and software components.
  9. Explain the uses of a scanner.
  10. Develop in writing a logical argument for personal ethical standards related to the printing industry. Methods for demonstrating this philosophy should include but not be limited to the following projects:
    1. Research copyright laws (including software copyright laws) pertaining to printed materials and produce a four-page QuarkXPress document summarizing these laws.
    2. Present a five-minute oral presentation summarizing student's personal ethics with regard to the printing industry.
    3. Research and write a two-page paper (QuarkXPress document) explaining the ethical aspects of the employer/employee relationship and how student's personal values fit in with this relationship.

Exam Requirements: The exam is made up of three parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. The third requirement, a portfolio, is done prior to the practical exam. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam! The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam will focus on commands and tools used in QuarkXPress. Prior to the examination date, students must create a portfolio consisting of a specific brochure and form that must be prepared in QuarkXPress. These will be provided upon request by the program coordinator Students should bring the portfolio to the Commercial Graphics Department on Airport campus the day they take the practical exam. Students should also research copyright laws (including software copyright laws) pertaining to printed materials and produce a four-page QuarkXPress document summarizing these laws. Students should bring their research paper on diskette to the examination. As part of the practical exam, students will be required to demonstrate their ability to manipulate the format of the paper. The written exam will count as 30% and the hands-on tasks and portfolio will count as 70% of the final score. Students must receive a minimum overall score of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Approximate length of exam: 1.5 hours for the written and two 5 hours sessions for the practical

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CGC 122 - Basic Offset Press Operations    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course covers the basic competencies required to operate an offset press.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  • Perform preventative maintenance.
  • Maintain chemistry.
  • Check and maintain inking system.
  • Set up job properly.
  • Determine ink and water balance.
  • Make appropriate mechanical adjustments.
  • Identify mechanical and chemical problems.
  • Identify various paper characteristics and specifications.
  • Make appropriate roller adjustments.
  • Make appropriate cylinder adjustments.
  • Read and interpret a pH meter and a conductivity tester.
  • Mix and match inks.
  • Demonstrate creativity.
  • Visualize format of final product.
  • Perform paste-up procedures.
  • Adjust camera to shoot different percentages.
  • Understanding imposition.
  • Plan for finishing operations.
  • Create basic layout.
  • Read and interpret layout.
  • Perform proper masking techniques.
  • Check plate and/or proof for accuracy.
  • Store flat properly.
  • Practice appropriate safety habits in each area.
  • Perform proper housekeeping practices.
  • Identify press problems.
  • Perform checks.
  • Use tools/measuring instruments.
  • Use various pieces of bindery equipment.
  • Perform cutting and folding activities in proper sequence.
  • Assembly products using proper procedures.
  • Identify paper coatings - including carbonless.
  • Measure quality against standards.
  • Measure variations to determine adherence to tolerances.
  • Take appropriate actions to ensure quality at each stage.
  • Communicate with appropriate individuals to determine end use of products to meet customers' expectations.
  • Adhere to MSDS (Materials Safety Data Sheet) and OSHA (Occupational Health and Safety Administration) standards.
  • Adhere to ethics standards required within the printing industry.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact eligible students to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam will include safety rules. The hands-on portion of the exam will consist of three two-color printing jobs. Two will be produced from flats provided by the department. The third will be a two-color envelope job designed and executed through all the production stages by the student. All press runs will be tight register; one will be run on the AB Dick style press and the other two on a Multilith style press. The AB Dick press run will be from flats provided by the department. One Multilith press run will be from flats provided by the department. The envelope job will be run on a Multilith. The written exam will count as 30% and the hands-on tasks will count as 70% of the final score. Students must receive a minimum overall score of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring:

  • Line Gauge
  • Linen Tester

Approximate length of exam: 1.5 hours for the written and two 5 hours sessions for the practical

CGC 122 Exemption Credit
Hands-On Tasks

The hands-on portion of the exam will consist of three two-color printing jobs. Two will be produced from flats provided by the department. The third will be a two-color envelope job designed and executed through all the production stages by the student. All press runs will be tight register; one will be run on the AB Dick style press and the other two on a Multilith style press. The AB Dick press run will be from flats provided by the department. One Multilith press run will be from flats provided by the department. The envelope job will be run on a Multilith.

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CGC 125 - Basic Offset Preparation    3.0 Credits

Course Description: This course covers the basics of preparing a job to be reproduced from the mechanical stage to preparing the offset printing plate.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  • Demonstrate creativity.
  • Visualize format of final product.
  • Correctly identify samples of picture reproductions, including line drawings, halftones, duotones, special effects halftones, process color, and posterizations.
  • Identify and use equipment normally found in a darkroom.
  • Use layout tools accurately and safely.
  • Perform paste-up procedures.
  • Practice appropriate safety habits in each area.
  • Produce line, halftone, duotone, double dot duotone, and re-screened halftone negatives.
  • Use a densitometer.
  • Calculate exposure and development times for line and halftone copy, including problem copy.
  • Produce special effects negatives, including spreads and chokes, posterizations and outline type.
  • Produce a duplicate negative.
  • Mix both stock and working solutions for chemistry used in reproduction photography area.
  • Adjust camera to shoot different percentages.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam will emphasize photographic processing, including determining f/stops and exposures for given situations. For the hands-on practical exam, students should be prepared to produce line, halftone, duotone, double dot duotone and/or re-screened halftone negatives. The hands-on tasks will account for 70% of the final score, and the written portion will account for 30%. Students must score a minimum of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Proportion Wheel Linen Tester Line Gauge

Approximate length of exam: 1.5 hours for the written and two 5 hours sessions for the practical

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EEM 117 - AC/DC Circuits I    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of direct and alternating theory, Ohm's Law, series, parallel, and combination circuits. Circuits are constructed and tested.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Use Ohm's Law.
  2. Apply knowledge of the characteristics of voltage, current, resistance, and power in a series circuit.
  3. Calculate unknown components and/or circuit quantities in a given series, parallel, and/or series/parallel circuit.
  4. Read a scale on a voltmeter, ammeter, or ohmmeter.
  5. Build a simple series, parallel, or series parallel circuit; measure total resistance of each load; apply a voltage and measure current and voltage drops across each load; calculate power.
  6. Use proper procedures when working with live circuits.
  7. Using the input current and voltage and output horsepower of a motor, calculate the efficiency of that motor.
  8. Using the length, diameter, type of material, and temperature, determine appropriate wire size for specific applications.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam requires students to analyze circuits by using applied mathematics related to the study of direct and alternating current theory. The practical exam requires them to use a multi meter and perform calculations related to circuit analysis. Students must pass both exams with minimum scores of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Scientific calculator

Approximate length of exam: 1 hour for written and 2 hours for practical

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EEM 118 - AC/DC Circuits II 4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a continuation of the study of direct and alternating current theory to include circuit analysis using mathematics and verified with electrical measurements.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Use given formulas, calculate instantaneous voltages and currents throughout a given sine wave.
  2. Use given formulas, calculate frequency and RMS values for a given sine wave.
  3. Use given formulas, calculate the specific voltage values at various phase angles.
  4. Use given formulas, calculate voltage, current, power, and impedance of resistors, capacitors, and inductors in various AC circuits (series and parallel).
  5. Use given standards and appropriate meters, measure AC voltage and current of given loads.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact them to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written exam requires students to analyze circuits by using applied mathematics related to the study of direct and alternating current theory. The practical exam requires them to use a multi meter and perform calculations related to circuit analysis. Students must pass both exams with minimum scores of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Scientific calculator

Approximate length of exam: 1 hour for written and 2 hours for practical

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EEM 172 - Electrical Print Reading    4.0 Credits

Course Description: This course is a study of electrical prints as they pertain to layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in residential, commercial, and/or industrial complexes.

Exemption Competencies: Students should be able to perform the following:

  1. Identify electrical symbols, use specifications, and read blueprints.
  2. Interpret conduit runs within the slab.
  3. Interpret overhead conduits for lighting, signal, and alarm systems.
  4. Interpret conduit runs for heating, air conditioning, and ventilator systems.
  5. Interpret panelboards, subfeeders, protective devices, substations, general branch circuits, and special equipment, and metering systems.
  6. Verify that all electrical installations comply with local and national codes.

Exam Requirements: Given electrical prints, students will interpret print information by answering questions on a written test. Students must pass the exam with a minimum score of 70 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Pencil

Approximate length of exam: 2 hours

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MTT 121 - Machine Tool Theory I    3.0 Credits
MTT 122 - Machine Tool Practice I 4.0 Credits

Course Descriptions: MTT 121 covers the principles involved in the production of precision metal parts. MTT 122 is a continuation of MTT 121 and covers the practical application of the principles taught in MTT 121.

Note: MTT 121 and 122 are co-requisites; therefore, the students must exempt both courses in order to receive exemption credit.

Exemption Competencies: See the task list below for exemption competencies.

Exam Requirements: The exam is taken in two parts. The first part, a written exam, is taken in the Assessment Center. The practical, hands-on exam is taken in the department. Only students who pass the written exam will be allowed to take the practical exam. The department chair or program director will contact eligible students to schedule a day & time for the practical exam. The written part will consist of a multiple-choice exam covering the exemption competencies listed below. The practical exam will require students to apply these concepts by completing a project in the lab. Students must pass a safety quiz prior to entering the lab. Students must pass both the written exam and the lab project with a minimum score of 77 to receive exemption credit.

Materials to bring: Appropriate clothing/shoes for shop environment.

Approximate length of exam: 1 hour for the written and 4 hours for the practicals

MTT 121 & MTT 122
Machine Tool Task List

  1. Demonstrate proper selection, safe use, and accurate reading of such semi-precision and precision instruments as:
    1. Rules
    2. Protractors
    3. Squares
    4. Vernier calipers and height gauges to 001
    5. Micrometers to .0001
    6. Dial indicators.
  2. Demonstrate proper selection and safe use of squares, dividers, scribes, surface and height gauges, protractors, and surface and angle plates to accurately layout parts.
  3. Demonstrate proper selection, care, and safe use of such hand tools as:
    1. Ball peen hammer
    2. Soft face hammer
    3. Hack saw
    4. Chisels
    5. Bench vise
    6. Wrenches
    7. Punches
    8. Taps and tap wrenches
    9. Dies and diestocks
    10. Files.
  4. Select appropriate files and hand file a project to within given tolerances and explain and apply the concept of precision work.
  5. Demonstrate proper set and safe use of cut-off saws (blade and abrasive):
    1. Identify the various parts of cut-off saws.
    2. Select and install blades properly.
    3. Cut stock square.
    4. Cut stock on given angles.
    5. Properly adjust blade guides.
    6. Select appropriate coolant for material to be cut.
    7. Demonstrate use of appropriate safety precautions.
  6. Demonstrate proper set-up and safe use of vertical band saw for accurate contour cutting:
    1. Identify the various parts of a vertical band saw.
    2. Select appropriate saw guides.
    3. Select and properly install appropriate blade.
    4. Adjust saw guides.
    5. Adjust overarm support.
    6. Select appropriate feeds and speeds.
    7. Demonstrate use of proper safety precautions.
    8. Demonstrate proper procedures for welding saw blades.
    9. Make straight cuts.
    10. Make contour cuts.
  7. Demonstrate use of the decimal equivalent and tap drill charts when selecting:
    1. Taps
    2. Reamers
    3. Drills
    4. Drill size progression.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of the following:
    1. Various thread types (such as coarse, fine, special)
    2. Parts (such as major, minor, pitch diameters)
    3. Classes of thread fit
    4. Appropriate selection of taps, bolts, and screws.
  9. Demonstrate proper set-up and safe use of drill presses:
    1. Identify the various parts of a drill press.
    2. Select appropriate cutting speeds and feeds for given materials when performing the following:
      1. Drilling
      2. Countersinking
      3. Counterboring
      4. Reaming
      5. Tapping
    3. Given cutting speeds, determine RPM's.
    4. Use proper clamping techniques for specific devices.
    5. Demonstrate use of appropriate safety precautions.
    6. Select appropriate coolants for materials to be machined.
  10. Demonstrate safe and proper use of techniques to hand sharpen drill bits:
    1. Select point angle for material to be drilled.
    2. Grind proper lip clearance, lip angle, and lip length.
    3. Thin web.
  11. Demonstrate proper set-up and safe use of pedestal grinder:
    1. Identify the various parts of a pedestal grinder.
    2. Select and properly install appropriate grinding wheel.
    3. Check wheels for cracks before installation.
    4. Properly adjust tool rest and spark guards.
    5. Properly dress and true grinding wheels.
    6. Assure that all safety equipment is in place prior to use.
  12. Demonstrate proper set-up and safe use of engine lathe.
    1. Identify the various parts of a lathe.
      1. Set proper speeds.
      2. Set proper feeds.
    2. Select and properly install holding device:
      1. Chuck
      2. Center and driver
      3. Collect attachment.
    3. Indicate four jaw chucks.
    4. Grind tool bit and properly set-up for:
      1. Turning
      2. Facing
      3. Threading
      4. Parting
      5. Form Cutting.
    5. Indicate facing and turning operations.
    6. Perform taper cutting operations:
      1. Offset tailstock
      2. Compound reset
      3. Taper attachment.
    7. Perform thread cutting.
      1. Single point tool
      2. Threading die
    8. Perform drilling, reaming, counter boring, countersinking, and tapping operations.
    9. Perform knurling, necking, and cutoff operations.
  13. Demonstrate ability to properly clean and maintain all machines used.
  14. Set-up and safely operate the machine tools necessary to perform the operations described above.
  15. Hand sharpen lathe cutting tools and drill bits.

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